THE DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AGAINST AFGHAN WOMEN IN ATIQ RAHIMI’S THE PATIENCE STONE: A FEMINIST NEW HISTORICISM READING

Dyah Rochmawati

Abstract


Domestic violence is physical, psychological, sexual or financial violence that takes place within an intimate or family-type relationship and forms a pattern of coercive and controlling behavior. It is very common: research shows that it affects one in four women in their lifetime. Two women a week are killed by their partners or former partners. All forms of domestic violence - psychological, financial, emotional and physical - come from the abuser's desire for power and control over an intimate partner or other family members. Domestic violence is repetitive and life-threatening, it tends to worsen over time and it destroys the lives of women and children. Domestic violence has long been common in Afghanistan as depicted in Atiq Rahimi’s Patience Stone. The present article discusses the domestic violence against Afghan Women in the novel through the lenses of feminism and new historicism. It is also combined with Rabrindranath Tagore’s conception on woman.


References


Bhattacharya, Asoke. 2009. Tagore in the Right Education in India. In Asia-Pacific Journal of Social Sciences, Vol. I (2), June-December. Retrieved from http:// www.socialsciences-ejournal.org. on 28 January 2012.

Chauduri, Sutapa. 2010. Signifying the Self: Intersections of Class, Caste, and Gender in Rabindranath Tagore’s Dance Drama Chandalika (1938). In Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities. Amrit Sen (ed), Vol 2, No 4, 549-558.

Cortright, David and Persinger, Sarah Smiles. 2010. Afghan. Women Speak: Enhancing Security and Human Rights in Afghanistan. The Korc Institute for International Peace Studies of University of Notre Dame.

Dogan, Evrim. 2005. New Historicism and Renaissance Culture. In Ankara Üniversitesi Dil ve Tarih-Coğrafya Fakültesi Dergisi, 45,1 (2005) 77-95.

Gardner, Catherine Villaneuva. 2006. Historical Dictionary of Feminist Philosophy. Maryland: Scarecrow Press, Inc.

Goel, Shilpi. 2010. Feminist Literary Criticism. Retrieved from http://www.languageinindia.com on 27 January 2012.

Hogan, Patrick Colm. 2000. Philosophical Approaches to the Study of Literature. Gainesville: The University Press of Florida.

Human Rights, United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan and Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights.2009. Silence is Violence: End the Abuse of Women in Afghanistan. Kabul and Geneva: UNAMA Human Rights.

Lai, Chung-Hsiung. 2006. Limits and Beyond: Greenblatt, New Historicism, and a Feminist Genealogy. In Intergrams, 7.1-7.2. Retrieved from http://benz.nchu.edu.tw/~intergrams/071-072/071-072-lai.pdf on 28 January 2012.

Plain, Gill and Sellers, Susan. 2007. A History of Feminist Literary Criticism. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Qantara de. 2009. Portrait of a Brave Woman. Retrieved from http://www.Qantara.de on 27 January 2012.

Rahimi, Atiq. 2010. The Patience Stone (Translated from the French by Polly McLean). London: Chatto & Windus.

Ray, Bharati. 2010. “New Women” in Rabindranath Tagore’s Short Stories: An Interrogation of “Laboratory”. In Asiatic, Volume 4, Number 2, p.p. 68-81.

Tagore, Rabindranath. 2003. Woman. In Personality: The Essay. New Delhi: Sherijee’s Book International.

The Population Information Program, Center for Communication Programs. 1999. Ending Violence against Women. In Issues in World Health. Volume XXVII, Number 4, December 1999. Maryland: The Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health.

UNAMA Human Rights. 2010. Harmful Traditional Practices and Implementation of the Law on Elimination of Violence against Women in Afghanistan. Kabul and Geneva: UNAMA Human Rights.

Veeser, Aram, H. 2007. Re-Membering a Deformed Past: (New) New Historicism. In The Journal of the Midwest Modern Language Association, Vol. 24, No. 1, Cultural Studies and New Historicism. (Spring, 1991), pp. 3-13. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org Mon Jul 2 16:52:40 2007




DOI: https://doi.org/10.21107/prosodi.v8i2.315

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.